Mineralogy Of Arizona

Author: John Williams Anthony
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816515557
Size: 13.27 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 14

Long awaited by professional geologists and amateur rockhounds alike, the new Mineralogy of Arizona is a completely revised and greatly expanded edition of a book first published in 1977 and updated in 1982.

Minerals Of Arizona

Author: Neil R. Bearce
Publisher:
ISBN: 0945005334
Size: 12.11 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 78

The complete guide for both novice rockhounds and experienced rock and mineral collectors with new and exciting collecting sites that exist and are easily accessible. Includes topographical maps, full-color photos, and site difficulty scales.

Gems And Minerals Of Arizona

Author: Sharon Panczner
Publisher: American Traveler Press
ISBN: 1558380973
Size: 17.89 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 48

"There's gold in them thar hills!" Along with silver, turquoise, copper, and tons (literally) of other minerals. This guidebook explains what you will find and where in Arizona you will find it. Prospectors were right on target when they came to Arizona!

The Collector S Book Of Fluorescent Minerals

Author: Manuel A. Robbins
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781475747928
Size: 20.52 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 26

Over the last several decades, the number of people who are actively involved in the hobby or science of mineral collecting has grown at an increasing pace. In response to the growing demand for informa tion which this large and active group has created, a number of books have been published dealing with mineralogy. As a result, the reader now has a choice among mineral locality guides, field handbooks, photo collections, or books dedicated to the systematic description of minerals. However, as interest in mineralogy has grown, as collectors have become increasingly knowledgeable and aware of mineralogy in its many facets, the need for more specialized information has also grown. Nowhere is this need greater than in the subject of the fluorescence of minerals. The number of collectors who now main tain a fluorescent collection is substantial, interest is constantly increasing, and manufacturers have recently responded by the intro duction of new ultraviolet equipment with major improvements in utility and performance. Yet when the collector searches for any information on this subject, little will be found. He or she will seek in vain for the answers to questions which present themselves as in terest in fluorescent minerals grows and matures. Which minerals fluoresce? Where are fluorescent minerals found? What makes a mineral fluoresce? Why does ultraviolet light produce fluorescence? What is an activator, and how does it contribute to fluorescence? On these matters, the available mineralogy books are largely silent.

Archaeomineralogy

Author: George R. Rapp
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9783662050057
Size: 15.15 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 65

1.1 Prologue What is archaeomineralogy? The term has been used at least once before (Mitchell 1985), but this volume is the first publication to lay down the scientific basis and systematics for this subdiscipline. Students sometimes call an introductory archaeology course "stones and bones." Archaeomineralogy covers the stones component of this phrase. Of course, archaeology consists of a great deal more than just stones and bones. Contemporary archaeology is based on stratigraphy, geomorphology, chronometry, behavioral inferences, and a host of additional disciplines in addition to those devoted to stones and bones. To hazard a definition: archaeomineralogy is the study of the minerals and rocks used by ancient societies over space and time, as implements, orna ments, building materials, and raw materials for ceramics and other processed products. Archaeomineralogy also attempts to date, source, or otherwise char acterize an artifact or feature, or to interpret past depositional alteration of archaeological contexts. Unlike geoarchaeology, archaeomineralogy is not, and is not likely to become, a recognized subdiscipline. Practitioners of archaeomineralogy are mostly geoarchaeologists who specialize in geology and have a strong background in mineralogy or petrology (the study of the origin ofrocks).