Cajun Foodways

Author: C. Paige Gutierrez
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 160473602X
Size: 14.22 MB
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Study shows, Cajuns claim to be unusually food-oriented, unusually talented in preparing of foods, and unusual in their ability to enjoy food. Cajuns' attention to their own traditional foodways is more than merely nostalgia or a clever marketing ploy to lure tourists and sell local products. The symbolic power of Cajun food is deeply rooted in Cajuns' ethnic identity, especially their attachments to their natural environment and their love of being with people, both.

Cajun Country

Author: Barry Jean Ancelet
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 9781604736175
Size: 12.18 MB
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The first book in the Folklife in the South series and by far the broadest look at traditional Cajun culture ever assembled. It not only describes the traditions as they are but also explains how they came to be.

Ethnic And Regional Foodways In The United States

Author: Linda Keller Brown
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 0870494198
Size: 20.71 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 98

" . . . provides valuable information for the specialist in American studies, and for the anthropologist or folklorist focusing on food use, and may also be of interest to the general reading audience. With such a wide appeal, the book may not only document the American romance with ethnic foods, but may contribute to it as well." --Joanne Wagner, Anthropological Quarterly How do customs surrounding the preparation and consumption of food define minorities within a population? The question receives fascinating and multifaceted answers in this book, which considers a smorgasbord of dishes that sustain group identity and often help to bridge inter-group barriers. The essays explore the symbolic meaning of shared foodways in interpreting inter- and intra-group behavior, with attention to theoretical problems and the implications of foodways research for public policy. Topics receiving rewarding analysis in this volume include food festivals, modes of food preparation, meal cycles, seasonal celebrations, nutrition education, and the government's inattention to ethnic customs in forumlating its food policies.

The New Encyclopedia Of Southern Culture

Author: John T. Edge
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9781469616520
Size: 15.59 MB
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When the original Encyclopedia of Southern Culture was published in 1989, the topic of foodways was relatively new as a field of scholarly inquiry. Food has always been central to southern culture, but the past twenty years have brought an explosion in interest in foodways, particularly in the South. This volume marks the first encyclopedia of the food culture of the American South, surveying the vast diversity of foodways within the region and the collective qualities that make them distinctively southern. Articles in this volume explore the richness of southern foodways, examining not only what southerners eat but also why they eat it. The volume contains 149 articles, almost all of them new to this edition of the Encyclopedia. Longer essays address the historical development of southern cuisine and ethnic contributions to the region's foodways. Topical essays explore iconic southern foods such as MoonPies and fried catfish, prominent restaurants and personalities, and the food cultures of subregions and individual cities. The volume is destined to earn a spot on kitchen shelves as well as in libraries.

Stir The Pot

Author: Marcelle Bienvenu
Publisher: Hippocrene Books
ISBN: 0781811201
Size: 16.60 MB
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Despite the increased popularity of Cajun foods such as gumbo, crawfish étouffée, and boudin (a pork and rice sausage), relatively little is known about the history of this fascinating cuisine. 'Stir the Pot' explores its origins and evolution from the seventeenth-century French settlement in Nova Scotia to the explosion of Cajun food onto the American dining scene over the past few decades.

The New Encyclopedia Of Southern Culture

Author: Celeste Ray
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9781469616582
Size: 11.86 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Transcending familiar categories of "black" and "white," this volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture complicates and enriches our understanding of "southernness" by identifying the array of cultures that combined to shape the South. This exploration of southern ethnicities examines the ways people perform and maintain cultural identities through folklore, religious faith, dress, music, speech, cooking, and transgenerational tradition. Accessibly written and informed by the most recent research that recovers the ethnic diversity of the early South and documents the more recent arrival of new cultural groups, this volume greatly expands upon the modest Ethnic Life section of the original Encyclopedia. Contributors describe 88 ethnic groups that have lived in the South from the Mississippian Period (1000-1600) to the present. They include 34 American Indian groups, as well as the many communities with European, African, and Asian cultural ties that came to the region after 1600. Southerners from all backgrounds are likely to find themselves represented here.